Orlando counselor gives 3 Tips on Dealing with Loneliness

Anxiety we feel when we don’t feel emotionally connected to others. This feeling can occur to anyone because loneliness is subjective, and one does not have to be alone to feel lonely. There are times in all our lives where we will experience loneliness. The anxiety produced from the fear of feeling lonely can be so overwhelming that it can cause some to work hard at avoiding it by staying in unhealthy relationships or entering into new, less than ideal relationships just to have someone.

Certain times make being alone feel even bigger, such as entering a new work or school situation, special occasions, holidays, and of course Valentine’s Day.

While the idea of being alone is daunting, facing the fear of loneliness can prevent living an unsatisfying life.What if there were ways to embrace loneliness, and maybe even benefit from periods of forced or voluntary solitude? Let’s look loneliness in the eye and imagine what can be gained by embracing the times we must be one with ourselves.

3 Tips on Dealing with Loneliness

  1. Self-Discovery – Solitude, whether voluntary or forced, provides a time to reflect on ourselves, what we like about ourselves, what is important to us, and what we may have been missing in former relationships. This can be a powerful time of deepening our knowledge of ourselves so we are wiser as we seek out new companionship, we know better what we want and what we have to offer. Knowing who you are builds self-sufficiency which leads to confidence, which attracts and contributes to healthy relationships.
  2. Expanding Your Comfort Zone – Finding ourselves suddenly uncoupled can feel intimidating, but also provides an opportunity to stretch our comfort zone and discover things we have never experienced before. When we are part of a couple, we sometimes are so focused on the other, we miss opportunities to see our environment and those around us. We rely on our companion for advice, direction, and reflection. Now you have an opportunity to grow our circle of acquaintances. Can you reach out by acknowledging others, ask for directions, or help, or ideas from someone new? You can expand your comfort zone by considering exploring a hobby or sport you’ve been interested in. Researching and participating in a new activity can help you learn more about yourself, as well as widen your social circle.
  3. Experiencing Empathy – When not swept up in a friendship or relationship, we are in a position to open up and notice others. Is there someone who would enjoy your companionship? Are there family members who would delight in your undivided attention? Is there a person or an organization that you could offer the gift of your time? Relationships are important, and living in a constant state of aloneness is not healthy. However, consider using the inevitable seasons of solitude to help you find deeper meaning in your life, and you may end up benefiting many others in the process. This time alone, seen in the right perspective, can positively influence your future relationships.

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Author: Teresa Kovach, MS a Registerd Mental Health Counselor Intern at Total Life Counseling Center in Orlando, and parent of a three children.  Total Life Counseling Center specializes in depression & anxiety and our experts can be reached at (407) 248-0030.